Phenocerin Review 2014: Side Effects & Ingredients

Phenocerin is just the same old pill done by the same company (albeit under different corporation — one of which has been inactive for many, many years).phenocerin

With the exception of Certiphene, it seems like they all just sat around a table and decided that one weak formulation, if it ended with the same final two syllables (cer-in), would help people lose weight.

Marketing Pitch

If you go to the Phenocerin website you’ll see the same scam-ridden site you see at the other sites by the same company (see my review of Certiphene for a side by side comparison for how this company uses the same scam formula to sell the same product under different names and only slightly different designs).

As far as Phenocerin’s marketing pitch, I’ll break it down for you:

  • At the very top, they make the claim that [Person] lost [amount] lb. in [time] and they show a before/after photo that leaves you wondering if the person in the before/after photo is actually two people.
  • They use the doctor in the sidebar on the right to make you think Phenocerin is somehow endorsed by a medical doctor.
  • They use testimonial pictures that show questionable before/after situations, where sometimes I believe they’re using a completely different person for the after photo.
  • They use the scam “As Seen On” callout box to make you think that Phenocerin was featured on a major network (all of them, if you believed Phenocerin’s website). The way they get around it when you call them on this is by saying that Hoodia, one of their (useless) ingredients was featured on these major news networks.
  • They have the image of several magazines fanned out, again, trying to make it seem like Phenocerin has been featured in those magazines. And again, they get around calling them out on it by saying that Hoodia has been featured (or at least mentioned, probably) in each of those magazines.
  • They also cite some studies allegedly supporting Hoodia, but we’ll get to that in a second.
  • On the right, in the little callout box they mention how you can get a one-month supply of Phenocerin for free. That’s not true. If you examine their fine print carefully, you can see they’re out to give you a royal working over.
terms

Really bad terms and conditions

Keep in mind that you have to evaluate the efficacy of Phenocerin fast enough for the product to “reach our Receiving Department” within 14 days of the order date.

Ripoff Flow

You see what has to happen? Everything has to go off without a single hitch (even an honest mistake type of hitch, I’m not including here the fact that Phenocerin Inc. might be slowing on the initial shipment or also slow to accept a return, thus pushing you outside the 14-day trial period.

Autoship

And don’t forget, if you don’t cancel in time, they’re going to bill you $99 and send you three more bottles of useless garbage. Why is it useless? The same reason Certiphen, Lipocerin, and Thermocerin are useless.

Ingredients

Phenocerin’s ingredient profile is schwach, or, to take the German a bit further überschwach. It’s weak.

Hoodia Gordonii (see my entire scathing review of Hoodia) is an ingredient they tout as being backed by clinical research.

It couldn’t be further from the truth. The one verifiable study done on the appetite suppressing abilities of Hoodia Gordonii was concluded by basically saying there’s no way a person could take enough Hoodia Gordonii to have the benefits of any appetite suppression.

Phenocerin pushes the fact that they have this ingredient in there, but it’s weak. It’s a fad. Don’t fall for it.

Chromium Picolinate is one of those ingredients with studies falling on both sides of the fence. Some show chromium picolinate as an effective regulator of insulin levels (which helps regulate the body’s storage of fat). Other studies conclude that it is not effective.

Amazingly enough, the study that Phenocerin cites as supporting chromium picolinate doesn’t. When they cite it, they exclude an important point.

That part of the abstract that they conveniently excluded says, “there was no effect of [Chromium Picolinate] on body weight, abdominal fat distribution, or body mass index.”

Also, let’s not forget to mention that the amount of chromium picolinate used in the study was significantly more than what is included in Phenocerin, so even if the study had proven supportive, its effective use in Phenocerin would have been questionable at best.

Conclusion

The “companies” behind these products are really just one company, operating out of Naples, FL, with little disregard or respect for your average consumer.

They use misleading marketing tactics, dupe you into an extremely disadvantageous autoship program, dubiously exclude portions of scientific text meant to support their product, and offer (the same) products with a weak, ineffective ingredient profile.

Phenocerin is a sham product.

Phenocerin Review 2014: Side Effects & Ingredients by

Miriam Jones

Aiming to present in-depth information on different weight loss products while trying to stay as fit as possible. Please share your experience with these products and follow me on Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter.